Irish Official Sponsor

Irish-Knight

Irish-KnightThe Irish-Knight trophy is awarded to the winner of the Central Catholic High School and St. Francis de Sales High School regular season football game. The winning school receives and hosts the Irish-Knight trophy in their school, along with bragging rights, until the following year’s game.

There has only been one overtime game, which occurred in 2003 and one game that ended in a tie back in 1963.

The series is tied at 28-28-1 in Irish-Knight games.

 


Game Results 

2016 CCHS 50 – SFS 0
2015 CCHS 49 – SFS 0
2014 CCHS 61 – SFS 9
2013 CCHS 41 – SFS 9
2012 CCHS 60 – SFS 0
2011 CCHS 20 – SFS 10
2010 CCHS 10 – SFS 07

2009 CCHS 10 – SFS 00
2008 CCHS 31 – SFS 06
2007 CCHS 20 – SFS 14
2006 CCHS 31 – SFS 07
2005 CCHS 24 – SFS 13
2004 CCHS 07 – SFS 06
2003 SFS 16 – CCHS 13 OT
2002 SFS 15 – CCHS 03
2001 SFS 16 – CCHS 08
2000 SFS 35 – CCHS 12

1999: SFS 27 – CCHS 06
1998: SFS 14 – CCHS 00
1997: SFS 33 – CCHS 08
1996: SFS 26 – CCHS 07
1995: CCHS 17 – SFS 07
1994: CCHS 16 – SFS 07
1993: SFS 19 – CCHS 13
1992: SFS 12 – CCHS 07
1991: SFS 18 – CCHS 07
1990: SFS 13 – CCHS 00

1989: SFS 15 – CCHS 07
1988: SFS 14 – CCHS 06
1987: CCHS 19 – SFS 10
1986: SFS 31 – CCHS 15
1985: CCHS 14 – SFS 10
1984: SFS 28 – CCHS 00
1983: SFS 28 – CCHS 06
1982: SFS 17 – CCHS 13
1981: SFS 14 – CCHS 06
1980: SFS 18 – CCHS 14

1979: SFS 44 – CCHS 13
1978: CCHS 18 – SFS 06
1977: CCHS 19 – SFS 07
1976: CCHS 07 – SFS 06
1975: CCHS 18 – SFS 06
1974: CCHS 07 – SFS 02
1973: SFS 07 – CCHS 06
1972: CCHS 39 – SFS 13
1971: CCHS 08 – SFS 07
1970: SFS 07 – CCHS 03

1969: SFS 30 – CCHS 06
1968: CCHS 14 – SFS 13
1967: SFS 17 – CCHS 00
1966: SFS 26 – CCHS 00
1965: SFS 10 – CCHS 00
1964: CCHS 26 – SFS 06
1963: SFS 00 – CCHS 00
1962: CCHS 20 – SFS 07
1961: CCHS 16 – SFS 06
1960: CCHS 14 – SFS 08

1959: SFS 28 – Central 00


A History from “A Holy War – CCHS vs. SFS, 50 Years of the Battle for The Irish Knight”

On November 8, 1959, the Fighting Irish of Central Catholic and the Knights of St. Francis de Sales met for the first time at the University of Toledo Glass Bowl.  The fans on that chilly November afternoon knew this was a special game that had long been anticipated.  It was after all, the first gridiron contest between two Toledo Catholic high schools since the closure of the original St. John’s High in 1935.  What none could see was how these two schools would serve to define high school football in Northwest Ohio for the next five decades.

The history of the two schools is intimately intertwined.  Ironically, Central Catholic evolved from the old St. Francis de Sales High school on Superior St. in 1914 before becoming Cathedral High School in 1915.  Bishop Joseph Schrembs founded the school we now know as Central Catholic in 1920.  It moved from the original building on Page St. to its present campus on Cherry St. in 1930.  As a diocesan school, Central Catholic was host to numerous orders of priests and nuns as members of its faculty and staff, most notably the Oblates of St. Francis.  By the mid-1950’s, Central Catholic had an enrollment in excess of 2,200 students and the ranks of incoming high school students was escalating every year.  The Oblates determined that there was a need for an all boys Catholic high school alternative in Toledo.  In September 1955, the doors of the new St. Francis de Sales High School opened.  Among its students were many boys that had attended Central Catholic along with many of the Oblates that had taught there.  Although the relationship between the two schools was cordial, the seeds had been sown for a great rivalry.

By the autumn of 1959, St. Francis, which had fielded teams since their first year of existence, had an experienced squad under fourth year coach Bob Recker.  Recker was a ’49 Central Catholic grad and close personal friend of Irish coach, Tom McHugh (CCHS Class of ’50).  Though they had improved through their first three years, many thought the Knights were not yet prepared to do battle with the Irish, a perennial league powerhouse.  As the game drew near, the tensions between the two fronts heightened.  The first annual pre-game smoker which took place in the basement of St. Catherine’s elementary school was intended to be a friendly get together between the rival camps, but it was not without its share of intense confrontations.  The Knights ended up defenting the Irish 28-0, a result which stunned many in the area, most of all the Central Catholic faithful.  But as Coach McHugh reflects now, that loss “was the best thing that could have happened for both schools.”  The Knights gained the confidence to establish themselves as a new power in Northwest Ohio.  The Irish, who according to McHugh had not really taken St. Francis very seriously, immediately refocused their efforts.  Both the coaching staff and the returning members of the teams used that loss as motivation for future success.  It obviously worked as they did not lose to St. Francis for the next six years.  The following season the Irish claimed the City League title together with an eight place finish in the final state poll.  Following a second place league finish in ’61, Central Catholic reached the pinnacle of success with a 10-0 season and Northwest Ohio’s first ever state football title.

The concept of the Irish Knight was the brainchild of CCHS Athletic Director, Tim Dever, and Sr. Mary Genevieve of the Central Catholic Art Department who sought to create some kind of prize to be presented to the winner of the regular season contest each year.  The result was a small knight whose armor was covered in shamrocks.  The Irish Knights has been born.  The current trophy was designed in 1960 and each year the score of each contest along with the winning coach has been inscribed on its mount.  Be it on Cherry St. or Bancroft St., it is the centerpiece of the host school’s trophy case.